The Whistling Batter

The Banks Mural going up - based on Frank Duveneck's The Whistling Boy

The Banks Mural going up - based on Frank Duveneck's The Whistling Boy

The Whistling Boy by Frank Duveneck

The Whistling Boy by Frank Duveneck

If you’ve been anywhere near the ballpark the past few months, you have seen The Banks project spring up from the hole that Riverfront Stadium left to create some semblance of a neighborhood. It’s been great to watch and with the addition of just the Holy Grail it’s been a heck of a lot of fun for many Reds fans. While things are taking shape architecturally, there is a nice surprise on on of the large walls just off of Walnut street – a massive mural is being created before our eyes. The state that it’s currently in doesn’t lend itself to many clues, but just around the corner from the mural a couple of renderings are posted in a window. It turns out that the mural is based on famous Cincinnati artist, Frank Duveneck’s The Whistling Boy (1872), one of his most celebrated paintings.

If you look closely at the original painting, the mural artists have taken the boy’s arm, turned it up and placed a baseball bat in his hand. Pretty nifty work right there.

Check out some of the pics I snapped over the weekend. We’ll have to grab a few more as the mural gets closer to completion. What a great addition to The Banks!

The mural on Saturday, June 25, 2011

The mural on Saturday, June 25, 2011

Close-up of the full-size sketch

Close-up of the full-size sketch

Facial sketches hanging inside a space at The Banks, right by the mural

Facial sketches hanging inside a space at The Banks, right by the mural

Renderings of the final mural

Renderings of the final mural

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Panoramic - August 3, 2011

Panoramic - August 3, 2011

Many of Duveneck’s paintings can be seen at The Cincinnati Art Museum, as well as Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston – not too shabby.